The relative contributions of multisensory integration and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention to multisensory response enhancement (New paper)

VanderStoepSpenceNijboerVanderStigchel2015

The localization of multisensory information is generally faster than that of unisensory information when the unimodal components of a multisensory stimulus are spatially and temporally aligned. Two processes that can cause multisensory response enhancement are multisensory integration and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention. Although there is debate about the relative contributions of each of these processes to multisensory response enhancement, actual studies on this topic are scarce. In the current paper Van der Stoep and colleagues investigated when multisensory response enhancement is the result of multisensory integration, crossmodal exogenous spatial attention, or both. When auditory and visual stimuli are spatially and temporally aligned (perfect synchrony) multisensory response enhancement was the result of multisensory integration, but only when attention was divided between the senses. At 50 ms SOA, however, crossmodal exogenous spatial attention and multisensory integration both contributed to multisensory response enhancement. At longer SOAs enhancement was the results of crossmodal exogenous spatial attention, not multisensory integration.

 

Van der Stoep, N., Spence, C., Nijboer, T. C. W., Van der Stigchel, S. (2015). On the relative contributions of multisensory integration and crossmodal exogenous spatial attention to multisensory response enhancement. Acta Psychologica, 162, 20-28.